Archive for information theory

Symbols, Signals & Noise

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 8, 2013 by Brit Cruise

The following video/simulation was an attempt to bridge the gap between information as what we mean to say vs. information as what we could say. I view this as an important stepping stone towards Hartly, Nyquist and Shannon – which I will deal with next. It covers symbols, symbol rate (baud) and message space as an introduction to channel capacity. Featuring the Baudot multiplex system and Thomas Edison’s quadruplex telegraph.

Play with simulations used in video on Khan Academy:

Symbol Rate

Symbol Rate

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Electricity, Magnetism, Morse & The Information Age.

Posted in Video / Theatre with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 2, 2013 by Brit Cruise

The follow three video mini-series is a bit of an Engineering detour in the story of information theory. In order to easily grasp the ideas of Hartley and Shannon, I felt it would be beneficial to lay some groundwork. It began with my own selfish interest in wanting to relive some famous experiments & technologies from the 19th Century. Specifically, why did the Information Age arise? When and how did electricity play a role in communication? Why was magnetism involved? Why did Morse code become so popular compared to the European designs? How was information understood before words (and concepts) such as “bit” existed? What’s the difference between static electricity and current?

All of these questions are answered as we slowly uncover a more modern approach to sending differences over a distance…

The History of Electricity

The Battery and Electromagnetism

Morse Code and the Information Age

Click below to practice Morse Code!

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Information Theory, a practical approach

Posted in Research and Projects, Video / Theatre with tags , , , , , on January 15, 2013 by Brit Cruise

In order to understand the subtle conceptual shifts leading to the insights behind Information Theory, I felt a historical foundation was needed. First I decided to present the viewer with a practical problem which future mathematical concepts will be applied to. Ideally this will allow the viewer to independently develop key intuitions, and most importantly, begin asking the right kind of questions:

I noticed the viewer ideas for how to compress information (reduce plucks) fell into two general camps. The first are ways of using differentials in time to reduce the number of plucks. The second are ways of making different kind of plucks to increase the expressive capability of a single pluck. Also, hiding in the background is the problem of what to do about character spaces. Next I thought it would be beneficial to pause and follow a historical narrative (case study) exploring this problem. My goal here is two congratulate the viewer for independently realizing a previously ‘revolutionary’ idea, and at the same time, reinforcing some conceptual mechanics we will need later. It was also important to connect this video to previous lessons on the origins of our alphabet (a key technology in our story), providing a bridge from proto-aphabets we previously explored….

This is followed by a simulation which nails down the point that each state is really a decision path

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Information Theory: The Language of Coins

Posted in Video / Theatre with tags , , on September 15, 2012 by Brit Cruise

I’ll never forget the first time I was introduced to Information Theory. My TA Mike Burrel began a lecture by writing a string of 0’s and 1’s on the board and asked us to think about what it meant. It was followed by a trance-like state of excitement…how did I not hear of this before? Three years later I’m thrilled to be launching an entire episode on the topic. It was a true joy to go back to square one and relearn the topic with a childlike curiosity…My goal is to create a Myst inspired adventure which includes various puzzles along the way.

Episode #2: The Language of Coins